Curriculum Mapping in Physical Education

  • 26 April 2021
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The Big Picture: Curriculum Mapping in Physical Education

 

At PLT4M, we believe in setting common foundations, and progressing students through a holistic education into specific fitness tracks that allow them to realize their full potential, all while recognizing that no two individuals are the same.

This article provides examples for implementing PLT4M programs into your physical education curriculum. We recognize that there is no “one size fits all,” and that each school has a unique combination of goals, requirements, staff backgrounds, and student populations to consider when building a curriculum. Use this as a blueprint as you begin to map out your Physical Education Curriculum with the help of PLT4M. 

Keep in mind: program durations will vary based on class length and frequency. Visit our syllabus planning resource for more finite examples of weekly programming. 

 

Approach #1: Foundation + Elective

Provide your students with the foundation and tools they need to confidently progress into an elective fitness path of their choice. 

 

 

The goal of this curriculum is to provide every student with a strong foundation of human movement through the FIT 100 & FIT 200 level programs. The focus in grade 9 is to introduce the fundamental movement patterns with proper technique: The squat, press, pull, hinge, and lunge, as well as introduce elements of resistance and capacity training. Building on this foundation, grade 10 focuses on developing strength by introducing loaded versions of fundamental movement patterns, while increasing intensity. 

When students enter 11th & 12th grade, they have the option of continuing their physical education through Personal Fitness, Weight Training, Yoga, or Dance. 

The curriculum in grades 9 and 10 is designed to be instructor led. Lesson plans as well as fitness assessments are available to assist teachers with lesson prep and benchmark testing. The elective curriculum in grades 11 and 12 can be self-directed by the student or athlete. At the conclusion of the grade 10 curriculum, students will be well versed in the language of fitness, experienced in fundamental human movements, and capable of guiding themselves through individually assigned workouts via their devices. 

Cognitive Edu programs are incorporated throughout to supplement the physical component, and may also meet the requirements for certain health/wellness units.  Students will learn basic fitness concepts as well as begin to understand how nutrition plays a role in their training. 

 

 

Approach #2: Student Choice

Empower your students to create and navigate their own fitness journey by introducing a variety of training paths and providing the tools to develop within their wellness journey of choice.

 

 

In this curriculum, students are introduced to a variety of introductory level fitness paths in 9th grade. In 10th grade, we work to develop the skills and training elements within the various fitness paths. As students progress into 11th and 12th grade, they may continue on the path of their choosing, whether that be Fitness, Weight Training, Athletic Performance, Yoga, or Dance.

In this model, the 9th and 10th grade programs are designed to be instructor led. As students progress into a training path of their choosing, the curriculum takes on a self-directed format, allowing students to access and complete workouts via their preferred device. When students drive their own training sessions with the help of PLT4M, instructors are then freed up to act as floats, providing 1:1 feedback and support. 

Cognitive Edu programs are incorporated throughout to supplement the physical component, and may also meet the requirements for certain health/wellness units.  Students will learn basic fitness concepts as well as begin to understand how nutrition plays a role in their training. 

 

 

Approach #3: Athletic PE

Help students maximize their scheduled training time by developing as athletes whether they are novice, experienced, currently in a season of competition, or off-season. 

 

 

In this curriculum, we begin by building a strong foundation of movement mechanics, as well as introducing mobility training. In 10th grade, we begin to develop strength capacities through weight lifting, and help athletes establish baseline strength data prior to progressing into personalized athletic training—varying in volume and intensity depending upon their season. 

In grades 11 and 12, student-athletes will go through an on-ramp (GPP) program to safely and effectively transition back into an athletic training program, and re-establish relevant baseline maxes. At this time, student-athletes may opt to include supplemental training programs such as Speed & Agility, or Mobility, into their training. 

Cognitive Edu programs are incorporated throughout to supplement the physical component, and may also meet the requirements for certain health/wellness units.  Students will learn basic fitness concepts as well as begin to understand how nutrition plays a role in their training. 

 

 

Approach #4: Vertical Alignment

Build an early foundation and create a seamless transition from middle school to high school in order to maximize the development of your students and athletes. 

 

 

In this curriculum, the middle school and high school curriculums become aligned, allowing for a smoother transition between middle school and high school training, and more time to develop skills, strength, and variety in students training. 

In 7th and 8th grade, students are introduced to the fundamental human movements through the FIT100 programs. FIT101 & FIT102 include a total of 30 lessons, likely only occupying a portion of the curriculum and leaving ample time for lifelong sports, and other health & wellness units.

Students will develop a common language of fitness and training, allowing for a seamless transition from middle school to high school training. 

In 9th grade, students will continue developing through our educational approach to weight training via the FIT200 level programs. By the conclusion of grade 9, all students will have the same baseline fitness and introductory weight training requisites. 

In grade 10, we begin to introduce variety in their training by rotating through Yoga, Dance, and Bodyweight Fitness units. At the conclusion of grade 10, students will have experience in fitness, weight training, yoga, and dance, and will be well equipped to choose an elective training path in grades 11 & 12, and beyond. 

Cognitive Edu programs are incorporated throughout to supplement the physical component, and may also meet the requirements for certain health/wellness units.  Students will learn basic fitness concepts as well as begin to understand how nutrition plays a role in their training. 

 


 

Don’t see a curriculum map that meets your needs? Reach out to us at support@plt4m.com, and we can work with you to develop a curriculum that works for you!


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